Film vs. Novel

 It was cool reading the road, then immeadiately watching the film. We were able to see some slight discrepencies here and there, along with some rather big ones. I like the addition of a few parts to help add the anxiety to the film, like the bathroom seen. Mainly, I would say that the way the movie strayed the most was that I never got the sense that the boy was maturing throughout the movie the way that happens in the book. In fact, the boy seemed like more of a hindrance throughout the movie compared to the book, but it was a ten year old actor and he did pretty good. Overall, I would say that I enjoyed the book more. Also, I would like to see the film version of EL&IC now that the book is still somewhat fresh in my mind to see how they compare.

Cormac McCarthy

 After watching an interview with Cormac McCarthy, I found it interesting how he had developed the book, The Road. He says that the book was actually like a love story about his son. I can understand how this is so, but wow that’s a dark love story. The part of the book that I found the most gripping was when he gives the boy the gun, expecting him to shoot himself if he is going to be caught. Knowing that Cormac McCarthy had to have envisioned his own son in this situation adds a new element of emotion to the novel. When you put yourself in the situation the son and the man are in, it definitely hits a little harder. I’m eager to see the movie for sure.

Uraguayan Air Force Flight 571

 During our discussion on The Road, we came to the subject of cannibalism. The question was asked if you could eat another human for survival. Consider this…

October 13th, 1972- The Uraguayan rugby team, their families,  friends, and associates are all on a plane heading to Chile for an exhibition.  Because of erroneous dead reckoning while traveling over the Andes, the pilot descends too quickly. One wing clips a peak, then another.Roughly 16 of the 45 passengers died in the crash or later that night from cold and injuries. Many of the Survivors had severely broken legs due to the seats cramming together on impact. They had mere snacks to hold them over on the plane ride.

October 29th,1972- As the survivors sleep in the fuselage pf the plane, and avalanch sweeps down the mountainside burying them alive, killing 8 more.

December 22, 1972- After two of the survivors trek for over 10 days through the Andes , the men finally see a Chilean cowboy. Their ordeal was over. The remaining survivors would be rescued by helicopter the next morning.

Only days after the crash, food was gone and they had resorted to trying to eat inedible objects. Sheer hunger drove them to peel strips of leather from upholstery and eat it. They tore seats apart in search for straw but found only foam. The group ultimately made the decision that their only chance for survival was to eat their dead friends and family whom were preserved in the snow. Some had reserves about this, but after a day or so , they indulged.

Heavy stuff right?

readalicious: Goonsquad

readalicious:

A Visit From The Goonsquad was my least favorite book to read in class so far. The book was more confusing to me than the other novels we had read. It jumped back and forth too much and the narrators were inconsistent throughout the chapters. The end of the book was not that spectacular either. It…

 I don’t know if I would say it was my least favorite, because Goon Squad definitely had some good parts, but I was a little let down with how there were all of these characters at the end that I wanted to know more about. I also got the feeling, because of the chapters being separate stories having different narrators, that a real climax wasn’t quite established. The ending tied up a few loose ends but I thought it was very clever how Egan put Alex, the guy Sasha was on her date with in the first chapter, back into the mix during the last chapter. Her expressions “pointers” is pretty accurate to what is going on already today!

I’ve enjoyed meeting the new characters in the book. Bosco being one of my favorite. His meeting with Stephanie when he says, ”Time is a goon”, is very entertaining.  But, I hope to get to another chapter about Sasha soon. She has been my favorite character so far, and I feel like she is going to play a very important role going forward. I only say this because she and Bennie, one of the main characters, have a deep relationship. I am curious to see if her Kleptomania is going to get her into some kind of trouble with Bennie. I feel as though the moment Bennie praisies her for returning his goldflakes is not only a moment of irony, but also foreshadowing to a conflict that will emerge later.

Sherry's Blog!!: Goon Squad

sherryhaz:

A Little late on this post because I got off work a little late tonigh..but A Visit From the Goon Squad is even harder to understand than Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close. Each chapter is a different person narrating than the previous one. I previously said that you should take notes on…

 I am with you on the taking notes. At one point I had to slow down just to recap what was going on and which characters were introduced. The novel is pretty shocking though how Egan really holds nothing back in partraying that “punk” culture the characters were a part of. The shifting narrators from story chapter to chapter is confusing now ,but  EL&IC started the same way and I loved the intersecting of the narrators. Hopefully, all of the non-linear stuff will come together, producing a few ” A-Ha!” moments in the book. I’m wondering what everyones feeling on the book will be in the calss discussion tomorrow.

I got through the first few chapters of A visit From The Goon Squad by Jennifer Egan and wow, this book really grabs you! i notice that the chapters are kinda like stories, and I like the way they intersect by giving us different POVs from past and present. This gives a very post modern feel to the novel, along with the informality of it. The dialogue and change of time is also reminiscent of EL&IC. I enjoy the use of Sasha’s “problem” and how it emerges to give those moments of irony and tension. For instance, Benny notices Sasha has been “finding” his gold flakes more and more, which he is thankful for, but we learn at that point that she has been lifting fom Benny. I predict this will be an issue later in the book! I am eager to see how these characters will intersect , and overall I think Professor Clark has chosen another enjoyable book that goes right along with the post-modern theme!

I got through the first few chapters of A visit From The Goon Squad by Jennifer Egan and wow, this book really grabs you! i notice that the chapters are kinda like stories, and I like the way they intersect by giving us different POVs from past and present. This gives a very post modern feel to the novel, along with the informality of it. The dialogue and change of time is also reminiscent of EL&IC. I enjoy the use of Sasha’s “problem” and how it emerges to give those moments of irony and tension. For instance, Benny notices Sasha has been “finding” his gold flakes more and more, which he is thankful for, but we learn at that point that she has been lifting fom Benny. I predict this will be an issue later in the book! I am eager to see how these characters will intersect , and overall I think Professor Clark has chosen another enjoyable book that goes right along with the post-modern theme!

Midterm? Check.

Okay cool midterm is done, thats a milestone!Hope we all did well. Personally, the class has been painless so far, and I have thoroughly enjoyed the novels Professor Clark chose for us this semester. In just flipping through pages of our coming books, A Visit From the Goon Squad looks like a pretty entertaining one that I’m eager to read! Just the way there are pages with the odd charts and whatnot on them makes me think that the book, like EL&IC, will have a bit of an interactive quality to it . Atleast I know it will follow the post-modern theme of our class, which I learned I like! At any rate, goodluck everyone

falling man usage in bad taste?

    In class we discussed how, no matter his intentions, Foer DID capitalize in part off of this mans death. What if that was your family member? 9/11 is a touchy subject , and when you really dig up the gruesome things about that day, people begin to wonder your motives. Is it for shock value?  I had read many of the reviews of this book and many people were mad at the fact that 9/11 was a component of the book, much less the use of the falling man, and felt Foer was trying to capitalize. After giving the book a good read, I don’t see that Foer crossed the line (if there is one). Everything Foer mentions about 9/11 has a purpose in the book related to the characters, it makes the book better IMO.

Symbolism Thread

pwh1017:

I’m going to make the re-blogs real easy this weekend. Reply to this post with your own example and interpretation.

Lets talk symbolism in Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close.

Mr. Black hearing the birds after turning his hearing aid on. The flying birds is obviously “freedom.” Most likely from…

 The symbolism in this book in subtle at times, not so much at others. I would say that the key itself is a symbol for Oskar’s dad. I say this because the key has sent him on this journey that is in someways keeping his dad alive. His father used to always send him on the missions that had no real answer and required him to connect with others. Now, the key is serving that exact purpose. He even places the key in a way that it rests over his heart, feeling the connection to his father. Oskar eventually finds that the key is of no significance to him or his father. This is a tough pill to swallow for Oskar because when the key is returned to it’s rightful owner, the last bit of his father he had was gone. He now must deal with and accept reality.